Women for equality, change

By Christina Berberian

In downtown Los Angeles, hundreds of thousands of people came together in solidarity at the 2018 Women’s March to rally for political and social change.

The second annual Women’s March took place Saturday, Jan. 20 across the nation.

Hordes of activists in cities such as New York City, Washington, Philadelphia and Chicago came together to speak their minds.

At the Los Angeles march held in Pershing Square, women, men and children raised signs to express their grievances.

Some signs said eye-catching phrases regarding sexual abuse, reproductive rights, women’s wages and more.

Here at Cal Poly Pomona, students and faculty understand the necessity to stand up for your rights.

“I decided to attend the march because I was taught as a child to fight for what is right and what I believe in,” said fourth-year psychology student Sabrina Strach, who attended the Women’s March on Saturday in downtown Los Angeles with friends.

“The best part about being there was seeing so many people gathered together for the same cause.”

The fact that people are not happy is definitely evident at this year’s march.

Many signs and chants revolved around getting people to vote in order to incite a change in our administration.

Registering for the midterm elections was encouraged in speeches as well.

“It’s about spreading awareness about our oppression,” said Alexis Orea, a second-year marketing student who often frequents the Women’s Resource Center at CPP.

“A lot of people don’t believe it exists, but talking about it is making a difference.”

The first annual Women’s March in 2017 was started by simple Facebook post by Teresa Shook, who wanted to start a rally with like-minded individuals to voice her disdain about the treatment of women in America.

The single Facebook post turned into a revolution of women who have felt like their voices have not been heard, and are finally speaking out for what they believe in.

Different social movements were present at the march on Saturday including the Me Too Movement.

The Me Too Movement was created to prevent sexual abuse and harassment in the workplace.

“I am speaking today not just for the ‘Me Too’s,’ because I was a ‘Me Too,’ but when I raise my hand, I am aware of all the women who are still in silence,” said Actress Viola Davis.

“Every single day, your job as an American citizen is not just to fight for your rights, but it is to fight for the right of every individual that is taking a breath, whose heart is pumping and breathing on this earth.”

Sexual assault has become a more prominent topic in this year’s march.

After the increased revelations about sexual abusers in Hollywood, the Time’s Up movement was brought to fruition and was made popular at the 2018 Golden Globe Awards.

This movement, also created to prevent the sexual abuse and harassment, was present at the march on Saturday.

Protesters wore pins with the Time’s Up logo and celebrities such as actress Lupita N’yongo wore the phrase printed on her shirt.

This is a necessary occasion to speak up on this topic to remind people that when speaking about women’s rights, that black women must be included in the conversation.

The Women’s March has created an intersectional platform featured on its website known as Unity Principles which are meant to shine light on what the march signifies.

These principles include ending violence, reproductive rights, LGBTQ rights, workers’ rights, civil rights, disability rights, immigrant rights and environmental justice.

These principles proved to be evident at the march as these themes were represented by the protestors.

The LGBTQ community was particularly active at the Women’s March. Rainbow flags were raised next to signs displaying slogans demanding for equality and an end to homophobia.

Natalie Portman, Scarlett Johannson and Sarah Hyland were among the long list of celebrity speakers at the LA march.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti gave a speech praising the city for coming together and for the recent accomplishments women have made for social change.

Paris Jackson, daughter of singer Michael Jackson, read aloud a letter she personally wrote to President Trump about her need for change.

Everyone at the 2018 Women’s March came together to proclaim a common belief, best expressed in the powerful speech given by actress Eva Longoria: “What we’re calling for is sustainable and systematic change to the experience of women and girls in America.”

Thousands gathered outside Los Angeles City Hall for speeches and chants led by celebrities and city officials

Christian Berberian / The Poly Post

Thousands gathered outside Los Angeles City Hall for speeches and chants led by celebrities and city officials

Attendees carried posters in support of women

Christina Berberian / The Poly Post

Attendees carried posters in support of women

Thousands gathered outside Los Angeles City Hall for speeches and chants led by celebrities and city officials

Christian Berberian / The Poly Post

Thousands gathered outside Los Angeles City Hall for speeches and chants led by celebrities and city officials

Attendees carried posters in support of women

Christina Berberian / The Poly Post

Attendees carried posters in support of women

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