Zuckerberg’s new move, strictly business

By Tiana Teague

Facebook’s “like” button has attracted a significant number of
users which will hit the one-billion mark this year. Taking this
into account, Faceboook has become so big that this social network
has filed papers to become a publicly-traded company, or a

corporation offering the ability to people to purchase stock.

Is Facebook’s choice to sell personal information to companies
ethical? While it may provoke concern for firm supporters of
consumer protection, it should not affect any user
significantly.

Although Facebook has been a great resource of communication and
sharing amongst friends, family and companies, it should not
consume anyone’s life except for its creator, Mark Zuckerberg. He
has now made the decision to take advantage of Facebook’s success
by

going public while still maintaining complete control of the
company.

Zuckerberg is going to do this by staying the largest investor
of stock and therefore maintaining control and ultimate decision
making authority.

Facebook privately builds revenue from advertisements
applications, and virtual goods. Once Facebook has made its switch
to public ownership, it will make $120 off of each user’s personal
information by selling it to companies.

Users are unnecessarily worried about their information being
sold.

If someone has anything to complain about, it may be about the
concern of one’s privacy, and if that is a concern, then one should
not put information on the Internet. It should always be this
way.

Why is anyone complaining? Let public investors thrive off of
peoples’ daily lives.

Facebook becoming a publicly traded company provides a valuable
opportunity for income re-distribution; something our
working-middle class desperately needs.

It is much like infusing a stimulus back into the economy
because it takes money from the hands of the wealthy elite and
gives it to the less financially privileged.

As Facebook stands now, much of the information that may be sold
to companies could be prevented by not filling in the voluntary
spaces and what is included on one’s profile.

The concern about Facebook’s rise to becoming a public company
leaves users with nearly the same personal benefits and services
they have now. Other than additional ads, such as every other thing
on the web, users should not notice much of a difference.

The actuality of this change should be surprising to no one. The
reality of the situation is that this has become a money-making
world. Everything eventually advances and changes in order to
progress. Without risk there is no progress.

It is very smart for Zuckerberg to make moves in the right
direction and to bring change and more success for his company.
Facebook is at its peak, and he is now sharing control, relieving
himself from full responsibility so he can retire in peace. It is
truly a

brilliant move.

Even though Facebook users may potentially become billboards,
users need to become accustomed to change or highly consider
deleting their Facebook pages.

There will probably be a high increase of accounts deleted
because some inaccurately embrace the notion that “Zuckerberg’s
plans to make money off of users is absurd,” but who did not see
this transition coming?

Strictly Business

Illustration by Tiffany Tran / The Poly Post

Strictly Business

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