Green Hornet’: sting lacks bite

By Anthony Solorzano II

In the action-comedy “The Green Hornet,” director Michel Gondry
and writers Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg revive the talk show radio
characters from the 1930s and 1960s television show with their
unique brand of comedy.

While there were good performances by its actors and actresses
and unique action sequences, the film is overshadowed by the
overuse of action sequences and typical situational comedy.

“The Green Hornet” stars Seth Rogen, Jay Chou and Oscar-winner
Christoph Waltz.

The film tells the story of Britt Reid (Rogen), a spoiled
playboy who inherits his father’s newspaper after his death.

Soon after, Reid realizes how much he hated his father for
trying to control his life.

In the company of his employee Kato (Chou), Reid decides to
behead a newly made statue of his father by his grave.

During a journey to the statue, Reid and Kato encounter and
interfere with a group of muggers about to attack a couple.

Thanks to Kato’s martial arts abilities and Reid’s help, the two
are able to save the lives of the two victims.

After realizing what a good job they did, Reid and Kato decide
to become masked vigilantes pretending to be bad guys who fight
crime in Los Angeles.

After discovering and fighting crime as the Green Hornet, Reid
realizes what his father meant to the city.

Having director Gondry on board gave the film an imaginative
look that went well with the action.

In one of the action sequences involving the Green Hornet and
partner Kato, elements such as slow motion and highlighting the
weapons being used showed Gondry’s ability to think outside the
box.

The character of the Green Hornet is restored through the eyes
of writers Rogen and Goldberg, who are both known for their
sexual/drug-driven comedies such as “Superbad.”

The film’s dialogue differs from their other works because it
has fewer jokes about sex and more jokes about what is going on
around the characters, such as an attack of a gang.

“The Green Hornet” is more of a situational comedy, having the
main characters in out-of-the-ordinary events and their processes
of finding ways out of trouble. During a scene involving Reid and
Kato going out as vigilantes for the first time, they joke about
what they are about to do, embodying the situational comedy
genre.

While the film had its weaknesses, it also had strong points to
it, including Chou’s performance.

Chou’s performance as Kato gave the film what it needed:
positive help that improved the film.

Being Chou’s first American film, the actor shows off his
multiple talents, such as martial arts, singing and acting.

Because of the typical situational comedy and redundant action
sequences, “The Green Hornet” can be skipped and rented
instead.

Rating: 3/5

Green Hornet

Courtesy of Sony Pictures

Green Hornet’: sting lacks bite

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

You May Also Like

College of Engineering hosts lecture series

By Guadalupe Pinedo The College of Engineering has been committed to providing students with ...

Red Folder an opportunity to help students

By Daniel Flores The Red Folder, an informational guide given to faculty and staff ...

Faculty and staff attend diversity workshop

By Jessica Wang Cal Poly Pomona faculty gathered for a talk by a prominent ...