Sarah Palin: Her Early Career

By Wikipedia

Motivated by concerns that revenue from a new Wasilla sales tax
would not be spent wisely,[32] Palin was elected to the city
council of Wasilla in 1992. She won 530 votes to 310.[33][34] She
ran for reelection in 1995, winning by 413 votes to 185,[35] but
did not complete her second term on the city council because she
was elected mayor in 1996. Throughout her tenure on the city
council and the rest of her career, Palin has been a registered
Republican.

Motivated by concerns that revenue from a new Wasilla sales
tax would not be spent wisely,[32]
Palin was elected to the city council of
Wasilla in 1992. She won
530 votes to 310.[33][34]
She ran for reelection in 1995, winning by 413 votes to
185,[35]
but did not complete her second term on the city council because
she was elected mayor in 1996. Throughout her tenure on the city
council and the rest of her career, Palin has been a registered
Republican.[36]

Palin served two three-year terms[37]
(1996″2002) as the mayor of Wasilla. In 1996,
she defeated three-term incumbent mayor John Stein,[38]
on a platform targeting wasteful spending and high taxes.[14]
Stein says that Palin introduced abortion, gun rights, and
term limits as
campaign issues.[39]
Although the election was a nonpartisan
blanket primary, the state Republican Party ran advertisements
on her behalf.[39]
At the conclusion of Palin’s tenure as mayor in 2002, the city had
about 6,300 residents.[40]
In 2008, Wasilla’s mayor credited Palin’s tax cuts and
infrastructural improvements with helping the local economy,
“br[inging] the big-box stores to Wasilla, … helping Wasilla grow
and draw 50,000 shoppers a day.”[41]
The Boston Globe
quoted a local business owner as crediting Palin with making the
town “more of a community … It’s no longer a little strip town
that you can blow through in a heartbeat.”[42]

Shortly after taking office in October 1996, Palin consolidated
the position of museum director and asked for updated resumes and
resignation letters from “city department heads who had been loyal
to Stein,”[43]
including the police chief, public works director, finance
director, and librarian.[44]
Palin stated this request was to find out their intentions and
whether they supported her.[44]
She temporarily required department heads to get her approval
before talking to reporters, saying that they first needed to
become acquainted with her administration’s policies.[44]
She created the position of city administrator,[39]
and reduced her own $68,000 salary by 10%, although by mid-1998
this was reversed by the city council.[45]

During her first year in office, Palin kept a jar with the names
of Wasilla residents on her desk. Once a week, she pulled a name
from it and picked up the phone; she would ask: “How’s the city
doing?”[46]
Using income generated by a 2% sales tax that was enacted before
she was elected to the city council,[47]
Palin cut property taxes by
75% and eliminated personal property and business inventory
taxes.[38][48]
Using municipal bonds, she made improvements to the roads and
sewers, and increased funding to the Police Department.[39]
She also oversaw new bike paths and procured funding for
storm-water treatment to protect freshwater resources.[38]
At the same time, the city reduced spending on the town museum and
stopped construction of a new library and city hall.[38]

Palin ran for re-election against Stein in 1999 and won, with
74% of the vote.[49]
She was also elected president of the Alaska Conference of
Mayors.[50]

Palin appointed
Charles Fannon to replace Stambaugh as police chief.[37][when?]

During her second term as mayor, Palin introduced a ballot
measure proposing the construction of a municipal sports center
to be financed by a 0.5% sales tax increase.[51]
The $14.7million Wasilla
Multi-Use Sports Complex was built on time and under budget,
but the city spent an additional $1.3million because of an
eminent domain
lawsuit caused by the failure to obtain clear title to the property
before beginning construction.[51]
The city’s long-term debt grew from about $1 million to $25 million
through voter-approved indebtedness of $15 million for the sports
complex, $5.5 million for street projects, and $3 million for water
improvement projects. A city council member defended the spending
increases as being caused by the city’s growth during that
time.[52]

Palin also joined with nearby communities in jointly hiring the
Anchorage-based lobbying firm of Robertson, Monagle & Eastaugh
to lobby for federal funds. The firm secured nearly $8 million in
earmarked
funds for the Wasilla city government.[53]
Earmarks included $500,000 for a youth shelter, $1.9million for a
transportation hub, and $900,000 for sewer repairs.[54]
Term limits in the
Wasilla Municipal Code proscribe candidates from running for more
than two consecutive terms.[37]

Sarah Palin: Her Early Career

Sarah Palin: Her Early Career

Sarah Palin: Her Early Career

Sarah Palin: Her Early Career

Sarah Palin: Her Early Career

Sarah Palin: Her Early Career

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