CECCHE highlights Hispanic culture

By Paula Fuentes

According to the Pew Research Center, the U.S. Hispanic population now stands at 57 million, which makes Hispanics the nation’s second fastest growing racial or ethnic group in the U.S.

A large misconception about the Hispanic culture is that it is made up of one ethnicity, or culture.

But the definition for a Latin, or Hispanic person is anyone from Spain, or a Spanish decent.

That makes the culture a melting pot with over 15 different countries and cultures all bundled up into one.

The Cesar E. Chevez Center for Higher Education has created an Identi-Tree to encourage students to be proud of their own background, and traditions that make them uniquely Hispanic.

“We forget that there’s a lot of diversity within our center, and that’s what we want to expose with this tree, and how diverse we truly are,” third-year anthropology student Audrey Covarrubias-Aguilera said.

Every country, region and family has its own traditions.

From Chile, to Guatemala, or the island of Puerto Rico, every country has its own people and customs.

Which is why giving students the opportunity to hang up their own stories and traditions on this tree is a great example and embodiment of what the Hispanic culture is.

For months, the new addition has been under works, and now the Identi-Tree is finally available and up for students.

The tree is for both those familiar with the center, and for those who have never stepped foot in it before.

The Identi-Tree is painted on the back wall of center for everyone who walks in to see.

Anyone who would like to take part of the activity can simply take off a leaf from the tree, write down their favorite story or tradition for others to share.

The memories and stories could be posted anonymously if students feel uncomfortable, but still want to share their story anyway.

“I wanted to give students the opportunity to contribute who they are,” Covarrubias-Aguilera said.

The center welcomes any Bronco who identifies as a Latino to take part in the activity, and read some of the other stories and traditions that have already been hung.

The Identi-tree was created for students to share the culture and traditions held by the Hispanic culture

Paula Fuentes / The Poly Post

The Identi-tree was created for students to share the culture and traditions held by the Hispanic culture

Students can simply take a leaf from the tree and write down their favorite stories or traditions

Paula Fuentes / The Poly Post

Students can simply take a leaf from the tree and write down their favorite stories or traditions

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