25th Pumpkin Festival draws thousands

By Jennifer Morales

As over 60,000 pumpkins filled the pumpkin patch, thousands of guests walked through the AGRIscapes last weekend to enjoy Cal Poly Pomona’s twenty-fifth annual Pumpkin Festival.

According to Dan Lee, the communications specialist of the Don B. Huntley College of Agriculture, this was the first year where they had hayrides that took guests around the corn maze.

Another new attraction was the demonstration of agricultural activities like milking a cow.

The milk was retrieved by a machine and then transferred to bottles to let guests feed the baby calves.

In addition to the new activities, the expanded corn maze was another huge hit for all participating guests.

They were able to walk through the cornfield, while playing a game similar to hangman.

Children also had their own corn maze to go through near the Kids Pumpkin Patch.

Aside from the attractions, there were several organized booths set up by student clubs.

The booths sold a variety of festive treats like pumpkin bread and pumpkin pie, as well as handmade crowns.

“The booths are significant for them because these booths are major fundraisers for the clubs,” said AGRIscapes Director Craig Walters. “Last year, the clubs generated $50,000.”

For guests who wanted to learn more about the life of an agriculture student, they headed over to the 10-minute hayrides guided by current CPP students.

To enhance the festival experience, there were plenty of contests for everyone to participate in.

From a pie eating contest to pumpkin seed spitting and a children’s costume contest, guests took advantage of all the fun that day.

Throughout the day, people from all over the area stopped by to enjoy a variety of attractions.

One attraction that continues to grow in popularity is the insect fair. Guests, who lined up, had the opportunity to see preserved and live insects.

With the view of the pumpkin patch, guests were able to unwind after a fun filled day with live music and some delicious food in the gazebo area.

“My biggest problem is that I can’t get people to leave at the end of the day,” said Walters. “It’s dark, and they tell me just one more picture.”

This certainly proves that the festival continues to be a success every year.

The Pumpkin Festival started in 1991 and helps support the agriculture department while also serving as an educational and fun way to start off the fall season.

While the festival was only two days, the pumpkin patch will be open from Oct. 10 through Oct. 31.

Many will be able to stop by and pick pumpkins that were harvested by the agriculture students and brought to campus from Chino, California.

The Pumpkin Festival is one of the most anticipated events for families, students and residents in the area

Jennifer Morales / The Poly Post

The Pumpkin Festival is one of the most anticipated events for families, students and residents in the area

Guests were able to unwind after a fun filled day with live music & delicious food

Jennifer Morales / The Poly Post

Guests were able to unwind after a fun filled day with live music & delicious food

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