By Denise Dechaine

With midterms in the past and finals just ahead, students are
staying positive despite the looming stress of the upcoming
weeks.

“Thinking negative all of the time is going to affect you and
everything is going to start going down,” said Jessica Davis, a
first-year political science student. “If you think positive, you
will be healthier and you will get more things accomplished. You
have to look at the cup being half full, not half empty.”

Ashlee Handel, a first-year apparel merchandising and management
student agrees that positive energy helps alleviate stress and
strengthens the mind.

“Everyone notices when someone is happy,” said Handel. “When you
are happy, you tend to get more stuff done and you have a better
time at life.”

The problem with being so stressed is that it can affect the
health of your heart.Researchers at Columbia University rated the
happiness levels of more than 1,700 adults in Canada who had no
heart problems in 1995.

After a decade, they examined the 145 people who developed a
heart problem and found happier people were less likely to have had
one.

“Generally, it’s a blood pressure thing,” said Tom Knight, a
fourth-year aerospace engineering student. “When you get depressed
and pissed off, your blood pressure is going to go right through
the roof.

Happiness also helps you to sleep, which directly contributes to
your heart, blood pressure and that sort of thing.”

According to other experts, happiness itself could result in a
healthier heart, compared to other emotions such as stress or
depression.

“Stress, anger, anything which really upsets you does elevate
your heart rate,” said Johanna Rolle, a sixth-year animal health
science student. “When you are stressed out, your heart is going
like crazy but if you are just more calm, in a good mood and having
fun, your overall health is better.”

Some students such as first-year communication student Andrea
Herreria, attribute unhealthiness to the stress of midterms and
that always seems to be the time of year that students get
sick.

“Since midterms, that is the time I started getting sick and I
am still sick right now,” said Herreria. “Stress definitely brings
you down and weakens your immune system. It seems that when I am
done with finals is when I get better and happy all of the
time.”

A positive outlook and a few key tips seem to be the key to the
happiness students and adults alike need to remain healthy.

WebMD provides many tips to stay healthy such as taking control
of one’s time, acting happy, seeking work and leisure that engages
a person’s skills, getting aerobic exercise and getting enough
sleep.

The key is to incorporate all of the things in stride. Even if
it means going to bed an extra 10 minutes early or walking to class
instead of taking the bus.

With just these small changes, students will be less tired which
will lead to less stress and anger.

If students are still stressed despite trying to be positive,
they can try a few activities that students around campus are
doing.

Knight said he loves to bike and Rolle said she loves to pursue
her passion of veterinary science.

Hanging out with her sorority sisters, reading and writing,
contributes to Herreria’s happy thoughts.

Being around people she loves, art and singing are Davis’
activities that make her happy and Handel’s happiness-related
activities include music and spending time with her sorority
sisters, family and best friend.

Reach Denise DeChaine at: lifestyle@thepolypost.com

Don

Illustration by Roland Tran

Don’t worry, be happy

Don

Illustration by Roland Tran

Don’t worry, be happy

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